Question: Why Do They Say Bob’S Your Uncle?

What does the phrase Bob’s your uncle mean?

“Bob’s your uncle” is a phrase commonly used in Ireland, United Kingdom and Commonwealth countries that means “and there it is” or “and there you have it”.

Typically, someone says it to conclude a set of simple instructions or when a result is reached..

What does Old Betsy mean?

old beat up carA term used to describe an old beat up car (jalopy). Hey look! Rich got his Old Betsy started.

Where did the saying for crying out loud originate?

For crying out loud” is said to originate from the expression “for Christ’s sake.” How you get from “for Christ’s sake” to “for crying out loud” I don’t know, but I bet it has something to do with a father who was displeased with the incessant crying of his sprout. … And with that, the expression was coined.

Where did the phrase dead ringer come from?

The expression ‘dead ringer’ comes from American horse racing and originated at the end of the 19th century, when a horse that would be raced under a false name and pedigree was called a ringer. The word ‘dead’ in this expression refers not to lifelessness, but to “precise” or “exact.”

Where does the saying to at come from?

The T in the phrase to a T is likely the first letter of a word, with tittle being the most likely source. Other theories with little evidence point to golf tees, for their small size; this may have at least influenced the alternate form to a tee.

Where does the expression hunky dory come from?

The origin of hunky dory (or hunky-dory, hunkydory) is uncertain. Some dictionaries cite what may well be its authentic origin: Japan. In July, 1853, American Commodore Matthew C. Perry steamed into Japanese waters in his black sailing vessels, ending 250 years of isolation of Japan from the West.

What does me to at mean?

phrase [PHRASE with cl] You can use to a T or to a tee to mean perfectly or exactly right. For example, if something suits you to a T, it suits you perfectly. If you have got an activity or a skill down to a T, you have succeeded in doing it exactly right. [informal]

What is Kit and Kaboodle mean?

It commonly turns up in the whole caboodle, meaning “the whole lot”. It’s recorded in the US from the middle of the nineteenth century. It’s probable that the word was originally boodle, with the phrase being the whole kit and boodle, but that the initial sound “k” was added to boodle for euphony.

Why is it called cutting the cheese?

The adjective “cheesy” can be used figuratively to refer to anything that smells bad, such as fermented cheese. … Eventually, “cutting the cheese” was later applied figuratively to refer to flatulence, because like cutting a smelly block cheese, a fart can suddenly cause a smelly odor to broadcast over a wide area.

Why do we say for Pete’s sake?

“For Pete’s sake” originated as a substitute for “for Christ’s sake,” and other similar expressions. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, “for Pete’s sake” came into use more than a century ago and prompted similar sayings such as “for the love of Pete” in 1906 and “in the name of Pete” in 1942.

Why is it called Dressed to the nines?

One theory is that it comes from the name of the 99th Wiltshire Regiment, known as the Nines, which was renowned for its smart appearance. Why it should have been to the nines rather than to the eights, to the sevens, etc. … remains unclear.

What would best represent your mood if you say Bob’s your uncle?

“Bob’s your uncle” is a way of saying “you’re all set” or “you’ve got it made.” It’s a catch phrase dating back to 1887, when British Prime Minister Robert Cecil (a.k.a. Lord Salisbury) decided to appoint a certain Arthur Balfour to the prestigious and sensitive post of Chief Secretary for Ireland.

Is it to at or to the T?

The expression “to a T,” as in “That suits you to a T!” is often mistakenly written or said as “to the T” (or “to a tee” or “to the tee”). This type of alteration occurs often in idiomatic phrases (note “all of the sudden” and “for all intensive purposes,” among others).

Where does kick the bucket come from?

A person standing on a pail or bucket with their head in a slip noose would kick the bucket so as to commit suicide. The OED, however, says this is mainly speculative; The OED describes as more plausible the archaic use of “bucket” as a beam from which a pig is hung by its feet prior to being slaughtered.

Who is Larry and why is he happy?

Answer: It originates from a boxer called Larry Foley in the 1890s, before boxing was fully legalised. He won the biggest prize of about $150,000 dollars and a newspaper article in New Zealand had the headline “Happy As Larry” and the phrase stuck.

What does US to AT mean?

What’s the meaning of the phrase ‘To a T’? If something is said to fit ‘to a T’ it fits exactly; properly; precisely.

Why do we say Bob’s your uncle and Fanny’s your aunt?

“Bob’s your uncle” is slang, meaning: “There it is, there you have it”. Often extended to include “and Fanny’s your aunt”, it is often used when issuing a set of instructions or guidelines, in order to indicate how easy the instructions are to follow.

How do you use Bob’s your uncle in a sentence?

Example SentencesYou add two cups of water to the mix, heat it for five minutes and Bob’s your uncle, the soup is ready.Just give it a good mix and apply it on the affected areas, and Bob’s your uncle, the pimple will vanish in 10 minutes.More items…

What does Heavens to Betsy mean?

Q From Mark Lord: I am looking for the origin and meaning of the phrase Heavens to Betsy. A The meaning is simple enough: it’s a mild American exclamation of shock or surprise. It’s dated, only rarely encountered in print and then most often as an evocation of times past.

What is a Betsy?

Betsy is an English feminine given name, often a nickname for Elizabeth.

What’s the meaning of Betsy?

God Is My OathThe name Betsy means God Is My Oath and is of English origin. … Diminutive form of the name Elizabeth.